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Mosquitoes

There are approximately 2,700 species of mosquito in the world; the three most significant genera are the Aedes, Anopheles, and Culex as these types of mosquitoes are responsible for transmitting various diseases that are hazardous to mankind.

Mosquitoes belong to the order Diptera, the True Flies. Like all True Flies, they have two wings, but unlike other flies, mosquito wings have scales. Female mosquitoes’ mouthparts form a long piercing-sucking proboscis. Males differ from females by having feathery antennae and mouthparts not suitable for piercing skin. A mosquito’s principal food is nectar or similar sugar source. All mosquitoes require water in which to breed.




Aedes Mosquito

BIOLOGY / CHARACTERISTICS

HABITAT

Most species of Aedes can be found in the tropical and subtropical zones of the world. Recently, the genus has been discovered in more temperate regions, and its presence can now be anticipated on every continent except Antarctica.

The female Aedes mosquito lays its eggs on the surface of water; adulthood is reached within approximately six to seven days. The mature Aedes mosquito breeds, feeds, and dies within a week or two, which is the life cycle of most mosquitoes.


Anopheles Mosquito

BIOLOGY / CHARACTERISTICS

HABITAT


The Anopheles mosquito is generally located near bodies of water, such as ponds, swamps, marches, ditches, and rain pools. The Anopheles female favors laying its eggs in fairly still water that is oxygenated, and where there is an abundance of wild plant life. Some species enjoy the shady areas, while others prefer sunlight.


Culex Moaquito

BIOLOGY / CHARACTERISTICS
 
HABITAT

The Culex, like the Anopheles, tends to favor standing water to lay its eggs; however, unlike the Anopheles, it does not necessarily opt for plant and wild life surroundings. Instead, it often breeds in the outdoor objects on your property, such as barrels, cans, garden pots, used tires, as well as other places where stagnant water can collect.